Cream cheese

All posts tagged Cream cheese

Savoury Cream Tea……Romsey’s Original

Published September 30, 2014 by Daisy Cake Company

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OK, so we have a cake shop. Which generally means our major food group is sweet, sweet and more sweet. But occasionally, very occasionally, we digress to something a little more savoury.

However, we don’t want to fall too far away from the British ideal, so what we have invented is The Savoury Cream Tea…..oh yes people….Cream Tea with our other favourite food group – cheese – how could we possibly go wrong?!

The Original Daisy Cake Savoury Cream Tea consists of 2 delishly, freshly baked cheese scones, cream cheese and pickle, all washed down with a cuppa straight from the pot! And for dessert you could always have a traditional Sweet Cream Tea, or would that be too much?

So, hands up who wants to make some easy cheese scones? Yup, thought you would…….

Cheese Scones

Makes 12
450gms Self Raising Flour
1tspn Mustard Powder
1tspn Cayenne Pepper
125gms Strong Hard Cheese (we use Lyburn Cooking but mature cheddar is fine)
70gms Rapseed or Sunflower Oil
70gms Cream Cheese
2 Eggs
100ml Milk plus some for brushing the tops

Preheat your oven to 220c (200c fan), 400f or Gas Mark 6.

Line a baking sheet with baking parchment

Sieve the flour, mustard and cayenne pepper together into a large mixing bowl

Grate the hard cheese and mix it through the flour

Add all the other ingredients and mix until thoroughly combined. It’s best to get your (clean) hands in to make sure is properly mixed into a sticky dough

Dust the work surface with flour and turn out your dough.

Knead very lightly for 30 seconds or so.

Now you can either go for the rustic look or the cut look…..for the rustic look divide your dough into 12, roll into balls and place on your baking sheet. For a cut look, press the dough to about 1 inch thick and with a 6cm Round cutter, cut 12 scones and place on your baking sheet.

Lightly brush with milk, making sure your don’t let it dribble down the side as it impairs the rise.

Bake for 10-12 minutes or until well risen, golden brown and making your kitchen smell amaaaaazing!

Transfer to a wire rack and allow to cool, or just scoff the lot warm.

We always serve our scones warm…..they just taste so much better. To warm cold scones, pop in the oven, preheated to 170c (150c fan), 325f or gas mark 3 for just 3 to 5 minutes.

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Chocolate Cream Cheese Butter Bars

Published March 13, 2012 by Daisy Cake Company

This is what you get when 2 worlds collide!

Last year, the people of England (well women mainly) were up in arms when their beloved and quintessentially English chocolate brand Cadburys was sold the the US giant Kraft. Terror hit the country as the worry that a bar of Dairy Milk would somehow change in taste and texture, that a Wispa would would no longer be tiny bubbles joined by light milk chocolate, but would somehow be tranformed into a dark Hershey type chocolate.

Seriously, the British female population was gripped by fear……

……but of course there was nothing to worry about. Dairy Milk still tastes like Dairy Milk, a Wispa is still totally scrummy, a Caramel Bar still hits the spot, and Fruit and Nut is still as fruity and nutty as it always was.

What we’ve been given instead is a Kraft mix made in heaven! It sounds so wrong, but tastes sooooooo right. What am I talking about?

Cadbury Philidelphia

Lets just let those words hang there for a second or two……….

OK?

Have you tasted it yet?

No?

What are you waiting for?

Seriously, get to the supermarket and buy a pack. Try it smeared on toast. Marvel at how 2 things that should never go together, can somehow taste so amazing!

My immediate thoughts, when I saw Cadbury’s Phili, was ‘what can I bake with it?’ and ‘would it make a good cream cheese frosting’, so combining the 2 ideas, I give you:

Chocolate Cream Cheese Butter Bars

Of course you can use plain cream cheese, but I ask this in all seriousness – why would you?

The Butter Bar:
125gms Butter at room temperature
80gms Caster Sugar
200gms Plain Flour

The Topping/Frosting:
Approx 20 Hershey Kisses (I used Cookies and Cream)
100gms Cadbury’s Philidelphia
100gms Butter at room temperature
1 egg
200gms Icing Sugar

Preheat your oven to 180c, 160c fan, gas mark 4

This recipe makes enough to fill a 6 – 8″ square tray

First make the Butter Bar:
Cream the butter and sugar together.
Mix in the flour until you get a thick dough consistency.
Line the tray with the dough and pat down flat.

Next place Hershey Kisses at 1 inch interval across the top of the dough. If you don’t have Hershey Kisses, scattered chocolate chips will work.

Now for the frosting:
Mix the butter and Chocolate Cream Cheese together until you get a smooth consistency.
Mix in the egg
Add the icing sugar and whisk until everything is smooth and combined.
Pour over the Hershey Kisses and smooth out. Some of the tops of the kisses may poke out, but don’t worry, at least you know where the big chunks of chocolate are!

Bake in the oven for 25 – 30 minutes, or until the top has a crunchy crust. My tray was a little shallow so I placed a baking tray on the shelf beneath, as the cream cheese did overflow a little bit.

When baked, remove from the oven and allow to cool for at least 15 minutes. Of course it should be left to totally cool before eating…….but if your will power is anything like mine, you’ll try it when its still warm and oozy!

Cream Cheese Frosting

Published February 26, 2012 by Daisy Cake Company

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Cream Cheese Frosting….easy?!

You’d think so eh? After all it’s a basic frosting, so it should be easy!

But for ages – and I mean ages and ages – I was totally incapable of making a Cream Cheese Frosting without buttery lumps in it, didn’t slide right off of the cake, or wasn’t so sweet it made your teeth ache just looking at it!

But then a couple of months ago, I made another attempt at it, and I cracked it! I made some great Cream Cheese Frosting. So I wrote down the instructions, to make sure I always made great Cream Cheese Frosting. Yay….easy after all!!

But then, a friend, who had recently started baking, asked me about Cream Cheese Frosting, because hers was a bit of a sloppy mess. Hmmmm, so maybe it wasn’t just me after all!

Therefore, I have decided to share with you my method, as I’d hate for others to go through the distress of failing to make this seemingly easy frosting.

Firstly a few tips:
Fat – now is NOT a time to get healthy on me. Use FULL fat!! Use butter from a block, not margarine or spreadable butter and use full fat cream cheese.

Whisk – get yourself a good whisk. If you don’t have one already get to the shops and buy yourself a basic electric one……I promise you won’t look back.

Milk – DO NOT under any circumstances add milk to your mix!!!!!

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Cream Cheese Frosting

125gms Full Fat Cream Cheese at room temperature
50gms Butter at room temperature, no softer
450-500gms Icing Sugar

First start by whisking the butter and cream cheese together for a good 3 to 4 minutes. If you don’t do this you are in danger of having buttery lumps in the frosting – I’ve been there!

Next add half of the icing sugar and whisk. On low at first and then medium speed.

In order to not disappear under a cloud of icing sugar, if your mixer/whisk doesn’t have a cover, I recommend you get a clean damp tea towel and lay it over your bowl, tucking your mixer/whisk underneath.

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Add the rest of the icing sugar and again whisk on low, and increase the speed slowly to maximum.

Now whisk….just whisk….for about 5 to 10 minutes. The longer the better!!

By whisking you are adding air to your frosting, which, in the same way it does to egg white, makes it stiffer, fluffier and generally awesome.

Cream Cheese Frosting is never going to be as stiff and versatile as a good buttercream. But if you follow the tips and recipe above you will get a good, structural, frosting which is great for all flavour cakes.

I put my recent batch on a carrot cake which I took to my first Clandestine Cake Club.

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